Composer Dan Wallace Seeks Eccentric Wealthy Person to Fund Next Project

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eccentricI always hoped I’d be the eccentric wealthy person funding my projects, but seeing how I’m neither of those things, I’ll have to look elsewhere.

Before I break down what kind of money is needed and for what, there’s the big question:

What do you, the eccentric wealthy person get out of it?

– A monetary return on your investment, for one thing (details negotiable).

– But that’s not the best part. You also get to be involved, to some degree (again, details negotiable) with an artist at the height of his artistry. An artistry that can only go any higher with the help of a person such as yourself. 

– This will also get you at least a little attention as a participant in an unusual system of patronization (or matronization; I’m open to all pecuniary fonts). Most journalists fall somewhere in the range of appreciating to loving my music (though it’s possible that those who hate it simply ignore it because, what’s the point in writing about an under-the-radar artist you don’t like?; still, available data does not disprove my initial observation), so attention would most likely be in a positive light, but would at least be neutral. Note that the patron angle itself would be part of our PR pitch.

– At the most, you’ll go down in history for this … possibly as another in a line of eccentric things you did, but that’s fine, no? That’s what you eccentric wealthy types are all about.

– Income from previous CD sales during the first year (negotiable) of the release of this CD. In other words: there is a generally a spike in sales of past CD’s whenever a new CD hits a bigger audience. I would share that income.

– Tax write-off.

– You tell me. What do you want to get from funding (executive producing?) a viable music project that is equal parts emotionally engaging, intellectually stimulating and with which many existing and – more importantly – new fans will fall in love.

Now, the project:

Dan Wallace’s Next Album

Description: Depending on when you read this, it could be the one I’m releasing in 2009 or the one for 2010… they are very different albums, but the numbers don’t change.

About the cost: This is the minimum amount needed to actually see a return on the investment. The amount of return is difficult to predict, but generally with an independent you give it a good year in terms of CD sales, but the more you put up front, the quicker you see a return (new non-independents are often dropped from the label – or worse, shelved for the duration of their contract – if they don’t show a return in the first 3 – 6 months). Here are the minimum COSTS, preferably starting in January 2010:

Item

Cost

Description

Advance to Dan

$35, 000

So I can rehearse, record, play shows, eat, pay rent etc… for at the most a year.

Mastering

$700

Might be a bit less.

CD Replication

$9,219

Initial run of 10,000 digipaks. Many of these will be given away for promotion.

Postage/Envelopes

$2,150

For sending out press kits and such during the first few months.

Promotional Materials

$5,000

posters, stickers, flyers, postcards, photos, press kit materials, et al… for the first few months

One month tour

$20,000

Includes travel, hotel, paying one or two other musicians to come along, emergency gear fixes; I’d book it myself first time around.

Publicist

$20,000

Could cost more or less; I have not used an agency before, and they don’t display their prices, nor will they talk to me. Money talks, though, and the fancier the better. It’s hugely important that this is done right. Includes web (MySpace etc…) and print.

Radio Campaign

$20,000

8 weeks, could be done for as little as $10k, or as much as $200k, depending on how far we’re willing to go.

Advertising

$235,000

This is the biggie. This is mostly for a few full page ad’s in a couple of music magazines you’d see at Walgreens (they are around $60 – 70k each). The rest is for a few magazines you’d see at Borders and B&N.

Video

$5,000

This would cover a few low-budget DIY music and live-in-studio videos.

Misc.

$5,000

Could be less or more: the stuff you can never account for.

TOTAL: $357,069.00

So, where does the income come from?

CD Sales: if we give away 1,500 CD’s (probably more like 1,000), then sell the remaining at an average gross of $8 each, that comes out to $68,000. Subtract manufacturing costs, postage etc… it ends up being more like $56,631. Note: CD’s sell for $10 at a live show, and generally that money is not shared with the venue. The more sold at shows the better. Anyway, these should be sold out in the first 12 months at the most, 6 if the campaigning goes well.

Download Sales: the great thing with this is that there is no overhead, and advertising can be extremely focused in terms of target audience demographics. It’s also whence most of the sales income derives. Income changes depending on service, but generally you can expect an average of about $7 per album, $.60 per song, $.009 per listen.

Lives Shows: there is money to be made playing shows, but it has to be done right. My goal for the initial tour would be for the tour proper to pay for itself, and then to result in built up awareness etc… that leads to more sales and a more lucrative tour about 6 months down the road. More details on this later.

There you go! If you’re interested in discussing this, use my contact form to send me an email. Make sure you’ve listened to my music first, of course. I’m not a mainstream pop act. I’m currently working on two albums: one is what you might call “weirder” than the other, but either has the potential for fueling a viable marketing campaign. As for future projects, I have some solid, ambitious ideas. First things first, though. I look foward to hearing from you.

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Dan Jacob Wallace

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